Travel to Turkey for a Passage in Time and for the Peaceful Blue

Turkish Riviera, the Turquoise Coast

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From the Turkish Riviera Magazine The real wealth of Fethiye as a summer travel haven is its scenic charm. The sea, mountains and islands come together in an awesome magnificence. The natural vistas of Fethiye alone can lend a special meaning to your summer travel. The sea is a stunning sight at the Sovalye Island and the prominent beaches of Fethiye. The most popular natural attractions include Belcegiz, Oludeniz, Kidril Park, Gemiler Islands, Koturumsu, Katranci Bay, Gunluklu Bay, Oyuktepe, Gocek, Patara and many other beaches.  Gunluklu bay is a natural wonder, being 19 kms away to Fethiye on the road to Gocek where an alley branches off to the left which after one km ends up at Gunluklu Bay Anchorage. The anchorage is covered by different and aromatic aqueous amber (styrax) trees. Their branches and leaves in summer are so thick that one cannot see the sky easi... (more)

Chartering Enables Yacht Owners to Upgrade Their Boats

The principals of Trinity Yachts, John Dane, CEO, and Bill Smith, VP, sat down with YV & C publisher Fuat Kircaali to speak about the growth of the charter industry and how it affects them as yacht builders. Trinity Yachts, founded in 1988, is already known as the number one American shipyard. Since 1990, their 38-acre Louisiana facility - including 10 roofed acres - has turned out 33 hulls. Seven yachts are currently under construction. How did this dynamic company grow so rapidly? John Dane, CEO of Trinity Yachts, was running Trinity Industries' marine group in 1988, with 22 shipyards around the country building mostly commercial and military boats. Bill Smith, who was doing sales and marketing for the company, foresaw the rise of the yacht business and the two decided to diversify.   Their first yacht commission was fortuitous. It was designed by the leading Ge... (more)

Divan Palmira Hotel in Bodrum, Turkey: The End of an Era?

This 4th of July marked my sixth consecutive visit to the Divan Palmira Hotel in Bodrum, Turkey. My visit this year prompted me to write this review. The Divan Palmira Hotel is located in the Golturkbuku region of Bodrum. Two recent cover stories published last year in The New York Times Travel Section called this Aegien Sea summer destination The St. Tropez of Turkey. For those readers who would like to know more about Bodrum, especially the village of Golturkbuku, there is plenty of well written reading material (including these two 2006 New York Times travel write-ups). In this review, I will try to stay focused specifically on my most recent trip, the hotel, the changes which took place at this hotel this year and the highlights of my trip. The New York Times - Jan / 2006 The New York Times - Aug / 2006 Our Arrival on Saturday, June 30, 2007 When I emailed the hotel... (more)

Sultaniye Spas, Mud Baths to Care for Your Beauty

From "Turkish Riviera, the Turquoise Cost" magazine Lake Koycegiz in the south of Turkey, is very close to Dalaman airport, and almost an hour away from both Marmaris and Fethiye, the two of the most important touristic centers of Turkey. Around Koycegiz lake you can find many touristic attractions such as the ancient city of Kaunos, the famous beach at Iztuzu, the Dalyan village, the labyrinth of the twining channels of Dalyan that lead to Kaunos and Iztuzu beach, the famous Tombs of Kings on the steep cliffs just opposite the Dalyan village, and the mud baths at Sultaniye kaplicalari or spas are all within the borders of the quiet Koycegiz village. The waters of the lake flow through the channels of Dalyan and eventually they open into the sea between Iztuzu beach and the ancient Kaunos city. Iztuzu beach is famous for its perfect sand and the Caretta Caretta sea ... (more)

Yivli Minaret, Landmark of Antalya city

  From the Turkish Riviera Magazine If you ever go to Antalya, within the historic city walls of the city you will see a minaret not of the usual kind, as it is a brick minaret decorated with dark blue mosaics and has the look of eight flutes melted together into one. It is thus called Yivli Minare or Fluted Minaret and it has been the symbol of Antalya city for many years and also a logo of Turkish tourism as its photo has been for long years on posters advertising Turkey abroad. This is also because the minaret is in the very center of the old city and can be seen almost from everywhere.   The original mosque, Yivli Minare Mosque or Ulu Camii or Alaeddin Keykubat Camii mosque, is one of the first Islamic buildings in the city. The mosque was first built in 1230 but fully reconstructed in 1373. The minaret is 38 metres high, built on a square stone base, with ei... (more)

The Lycian Way

From the Turkish Riviera Magazine Lycia is the historical name of the Tekke peninsula on the southern coast of Turkey in the Mediterranean sea. It is a place where steep mountains rise directly from the sea, woody coasts, small but lovely bays mostly accessible by the sea, beautiful views and very suitable for trekking.  The Lycian cities in the history were democratic and their people were of independent nature. They developed a unique art style, and a high standard of living. They absorbed the Greek culture, and later were conquered by the Romans. Their graves and ruins abound on the peninsula and the walk passes many remote historical sites. The route is a 509 km way-marked footpath around the coast of Lycia from Fethiye to Antalya. The route is graded medium to hard and it is not level walking as it has many ascents and descents especially when it approaches a... (more)

Eating and Drinking in the Greek Isles

From "Greek Isles in the Summer" Magazine This is not an article to inform you of quality restaurants but rather to explain you the type of places you can dine while visiting the Greek isles.   Eating out in Greece is a national pastime and a leisurely pleasure. Whether dining at a local taverna or an elegant restaurant, Greeks take their time over food. The native cuisine is delightfully uncomplicated and quite different from what's found in Greek restaurants abroad. Much of the cooking relies on simple seasonings and fresh meat and vegetables.  Greeks like all the other Mediterraneans go out for dinner much later then the other Europeans and Americans. This is usually a time much after 21:00 o'clock in the evening and usually there is a time where you find only tourists in the tavernas.  For dinner you have the possibility to go for expensive restaurants but pe... (more)

Sacks Yachts Magazine Launched on Ulitzer

The Sacks Group Magazine The Sacks Group Yachting Professionals Magazine was launched today on Ulitzer.com. The magazine will be featured on Ulitzer's Travel and Hospitality section and currently accepting applications for its site editor position who will be in charge of the magazine's editorial direction. Previously Ulitzer became home for notable yachting magazines such as Absolute Yachting Magazine, OCEAN Independence Magazine, and the Yacht Charter Blog. About Ulitzer.com Initiating news coverage on any topic or launching a magazine at Ulitzer.com, which is currently in pre-beta, is designed to be as easy as boiling an egg and doesn't take much longer. For details on how to become a Ulitzer user, please contact editorial (at) sys-con.com. Once you've been handed the keys, you will be able to associate your future Web presence to whichever topic or topics suit... (more)

Sesame Halva in the Oven, a delicous desert from the Turkish fish restaurants

  From the Turkish Riviera Magazine Sesame halva is popular in the Balkans, Middle East, and other areas surrounding the Mediterranean Sea. The primary ingredients in this confection are sesame seeds or sesame paste called tahini, sugar, glucose or honey, and egg white. Also other flavourings such as pistachio nuts, cocoa powder, orange juice, vanilla, or chocolate are often added to this basic tahini and sugar base and thus there is a great variety of sesame halva. Sesame or tahini halva has been produced since the classical times. The dish was popular in the Byzantine Empire, and today it is very popular desert throughout Turkey and Greece. It is very much consumed by the Orthodox Greeks during the Great Lent and other fasts. In Turkey the term "helva" is used to describe mainly tahini halva but there are also other types of deserts such as made with flour, semo... (more)

June 30th Deadline For Mayor Mehmet Kocadon To Clean Up Bodrum

International Yacht Vacations & Charters Magazine This week I posted two blog entries about the much needed clean up in tourist destinations of Bodrum and its surroundings. My blog posts must have touched a nerve among the residents and business owners of Bodrum, some supporting and others criticizing my comments. Please note, I added my  answers inline. Mr. Salvatore Genovese Founder, Publisher & CEO International Yacht Vacations & Charters Magazine http://www.yachtchartersmagazine.com Mr. Genovese, Thank you for informing the local authorities of Bodrum with your deadline  of June 30,  2009 in order to clean up the aquarium region of the town via your blog post. You are quite welcome! Did you have a chance to inform the municipality or the other associations directly about your problem and your threatening style? 1) My blog posts were my notification to all responsible pa... (more)

Bodrum Mess and a Mayor Missing in Action

Yacht Charter Blog Dear Salvatore, I thank you very much for taking the time to bring to everyones attention the mess in Bodrum and the lack of action from the Mayor of Bodrum, Mehmet Kocadon. I live in Chicago and have a summer/retirement home in Yalikavak and I have to admit I have been amazed at how much the Mayor of Bodrum is getting away with. He is only available for photo shoots and media blitz but when it comes to hard work the man is a ghost... I am glad that people like you bring this up to the attention of the general public. I only hope that they will react to this type of constructive criticism. The area is absolutely beautiful but needs to be managed better. I commend you for your work. Thank you. Hal ... (more)